Friday, 31 March 2017

The Trouble with Nature

Those almond blossoms are all very well, but there's something intrinsically wrong with nature, isn't there? The 18th-century French painter Francois Boucher certainly thought so, and he knew just what it was. 'Nature,' he declared boldly, 'is too green, and badly lit' ('trop verte et mal éclairée').
 I came across this quotation today, and it reminded me rather of Ronald Firbank's equally lofty and absurd 'The world is so badly managed, one hardly knows to whom to complain.' One suspects, though, that Boucher probably meant it. He's not a painter I'm drawn to - his frothy Rococo confections  don't appeal - but I'm prepared to forgive the man who could paint the outrageously erotic Mademoiselle O'Murphy (below).


6 comments:

  1. You re-piqued my interest here Nige (I wonder why). First brought to my attention years ago, I remember being puzzled by the ambiguity of this image of a girl - a teenager by the look of it. Most obviously it inhabits, as you suggest, the world of the erotic, pre or post. But the gaze off to stage-left suggests a more innocent reading perhaps?

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  2. Those almond blossoms are all very well, but there's something intrinsically wrong with nature, isn't there?

    Yes. Way too damn many mosquitos.

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  3. Well maybe, MM - but I think that's a pretty big 'perhaps'...
    Good point, Skipper - same goes for midges, though at least they don't kill people.

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  4. https://www.behance.net/gallery/46472895/_
    https://www.behance.net/gallery/46463613/_
    https://www.behance.net/gallery/46463247/_
    https://www.behance.net/gallery/46451097/_
    https://www.behance.net/gallery/46460639/_
    https://www.behance.net/gallery/46462575/_
    https://www.behance.net/gallery/46450923/_
    https://www.behance.net/gallery/46450419/_

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